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Passion for Living | Eve White: Literary Agent

A Conversation With Anne Newton Walther Author Of Loss Of Innocence: A Novel Of The French Revolution

By Anne Newton Walther

Today, Norm Goldman Publisher & Editor of http://Bookpleasures.com is excited to have as our guest, Anne Newton Walther author of Loss of Innocence: A Novel of the French Revolution.

Anne has appeared on Oprah Winfrey, CNN’s Sonja Live, Cable Network’s Attitudes, NBC’s Jenny Jones and countless other local television and radio interview shows in the U.S. and Canada. To her credit Anne coined the phrase “divorce hangover” and brought it into the lexicon of divorce. Her book, Divorce Hangover, deals with the emotional after effects of divorce. She has a background in history and psychology and heads a divorce and career counseling firm. Anne was raised in Virginia and now lives in San Francisco where she and her husband raised their five children.

Good day Anne and thanks for participating in our interview.

Anne:

Hi, Norm. It’s my pleasure.

Norm:

Will you share a little bit about Loss of Innocence: A Novel of the French Revolution with us?

Anne:

Loss of Innocence is my second novel about revolutions. Eugenie Devereux, the glorious central character, made her debut in A Time For Treason, A Novel of the American Revolution. As a member of the French nobility, like her friend Marquis de Lafayette, Eugenie is infected by the political principles and lofty ideals of the Americans’ revolution and is determined to see them carried out in France.

In Loss of Innocence, Eugenie and historic revolutionary figures of that period are swept up in the events that propel the revolution from its bright beginnings down a dark road to chaos and violence. The action gallops back and forth among the colorful locales of Paris, the Palace of Versailles and the Bordeaux valley.

The driving force of the novel is a little known actual conspiracy between a group of the French nobility, themselves revolutionaries, and Americans who plot to rescue Marie Antoinette and spirit her across the Atlantic to Pennsylvania where a town is being built as a sanctuary for her. The passionate romance between Eugenie and Bridger Goodrich, a historic Bermudian shipper of that time, is a vivid thread in this rich tapestry.

Norm:

What’s the most difficult thing for you about being a writer?

Anne:

The most difficult thing for me about being a writer is the isolation. It’s a lonely business. I must say, though, in writing fiction, I have a lot of company. I have all my characters to play with.

Norm:

How and why did you become interested in the French Revolution? And as a follow up, what motivated you to write Loss of Innocence: A Novel of the French Revolution?

Anne:

It was the natural follow up to the American Revolution and the natural next adventure for Eugenie. In both novels, an actual historic event was the catalyst that compelled me.

Norm:

I notice on reading your bio and as I indicated in my introduction, you head a divorce and career counseling firm. Does this interfere with your writing career?

Anne:

I still work with clients, but on a much smaller scale.

Norm:

Do you feel that authors, regardless of genre owe something to readers, if not, why not, if so, why and what would that be?

Anne:

I absolutely feel authors, regardless of genre, owe something to readers. I am an avid reader. When I read a book and am spellbound, entertained, informed and transported to a time and place and come to know and care about the people there, I feel enriched by the experience and indebted to the author of that book.

On the other hand, when the people and place are poorly drawn, the plot sloppy or thin and I finish the book (or not), I feel somehow defrauded and worst of all that I’ve wasted my time, the most priceless thing I possess. I feel I owe my readers, whom I appreciate beyond words, entertainment, information and a magic carpet that leaves them richer for the experience.

Norm:

In fiction as well as in non-fiction, writers very often take liberties with their material to tell a good story or make a point. But how much is too much?

Anne:

Norm, needless to say, I can only speak for myself. To me, there is a very special bond, relationship if you will, that exits between the reader and the writer. I believe that any relationship, this one included, begins with and is built on trust. To the best of my ability, I do my very best not to betray that trust with my readers.

Norm:

How do you come up with ideas for what you write? What methods do you use to flesh out your idea to determine if it’s salable?

Anne:

With each book that I’ve written I have felt inspired and compelled to take up the journey. In my non-fiction books, Divorce Hangover and Not Damaged Goods, I believe I fill a void that exists in the marketplace for people who are trying to work through a difficult issue in their lives. In my novels, I write what I, as a reader, would like to read.

Norm:

Can you explain some of your research techniques, and how you found sources for Loss of Innocence: A Novel of the French Revolution?

Anne:

Research, to me, is one of the great rewards of writing. I have a tremendous curiosity. I’m a natural investigator and interviewer, which really come in handy. First hand accounts, primary sources are invaluable, the best.

Norm:

Can you tell us how you found representation for Loss of Innocence: A Novel of the French Revolution? Did you pitch it to an agent, or query publishers who would most likely publish this type of book? Were there any rejections?

Anne:

All the above. Writing is the easy part.

Norm:

What challenges or obstacles did you encounter while writing your book? How did you overcome these challenges?

Anne:

Time is my challenge. I have a very full and demanding life, which I love. I am very fortunate that, so far, I have never experienced “writer’s block”.

Norm:

How did you celebrate the completion of your book?

Anne:

What a wonderful question! I celebrate WITH the book, doing book signings, promotions, interviews. I’m celebrating now with you with this interview. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to celebrate.

Norm:

Is there anything else you wish to add that we have not covered and what is next for Anne Newton Walther?

Anne:

I have received remarkable feedback from my readers about A Time For Treason and Loss of innocence which I’m very thankful for. What is especially touching for me are the ones that say, in so many words, that I have brought history to them, brought it alive for them, in such a way that for the first time they feel an interest in history, historical events, historical fiction that they’d never felt before. That’s beyond words for me.

I thank them and I thank you, Norm for giving me this opportunity. Your questions were VERY provocative and really made me look at my writing and my work from new perspectives.

Thanks once again and good luck with all of your future endeavors.

About the Author: Anne Newton Walther has a background in history and psychology and heads a divorce and career counseling firm. Anne was raised in Virginia and now lives in San Francisco where she and her husband raised their five children. Visit Anne Walther

Source: www.isnare.com

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